Current spotlights

May 9, 2022 • Current spotlights

Nick Scoville elected to National Academy of Sciences

Nick

Nick Scoville, the Francis L. Moseley Professor of Astronomy at Caltech (Emeritus), was recently elected to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research! Nick is the PI of the original COSMOS HST/ACS observations. Congratulations!

 

 

December 20, 2021 • Current spotlights

New COSMOS catalog is out!

The new COSMOS catalog is out and its accompanying paper is accepted!

The catalog contains 1 million sources measured in more than 30 photometric bands from the UV to the infrared. For the extraction of the photometry, our international team applied a new prior-based method to go even deeper and to obtain more robust measurements for blended sources. The catalog also contains photometric redshifts and other physical properties of the galaxies measured from their photometry using spectral energy distribition (SED) fitting codes like LePhare and Eazy.

This catalog is a major milestone for COSMOS, combining its multi-wavelength data consistently, and opening up new avenues to explore galaxy evolution.

You can download the catalog at https://cosmos2020.calet.org to use it for your own science!

October 7, 2021 • Current spotlights

Extended radio AGN and how they bend it

radioAGN_Vardoulaki

A team of COSMOS researchers studied jets escaping active galactic nuclei (AGN) to investigate what causes their bending. For this, they used radio data from the VLA and X-ray observations from Chandra/XMM-Newton to measure the "bent angle", i.e., the angle the jets form to each other in a two-sided source. The angle is related to the environment in which the AGN hosts reside and compared to magnetohydrodynamic simulations. It is found that the evolution of the environment surrounding the sources affects their radio structures and allows for more space for jet interactions.

April 19, 2021 • Current spotlights

COSMOS-Webb selected as JWST’s largest Cycle 1 program

When the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)—the long-awaited successor to the Hubble Space Telescope—becomes operational in 2022, one of its first orders of business will be mapping the earliest structures of the universe. A team of nearly 50 researchers led by scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology and University of Texas at Austin will attempt to do so through the COSMOS-Webb program, the largest General Observer program selected for JWST’s first year.

Over the course of 208.6 observing hours, the COSMOS-Webb program will conduct an ambitious survey of half a million galaxies with multi-band, high-resolution near infrared imaging and an unprecedented 32,000 galaxies in mid infrared. The scientists involved said that because COSMOS-Webb is a treasury program, they will rapidly release data to the public so it can lead to countless other studies by other researchers.